professor bernhardi

by Arthur Schnitzler

translated & adapted by Judith Beniston with Nicole Robertson

‘Prolonging life – we’re good at that!’

Professor Bernhardi is an unlikely comedy by Austrian writer Arthur Schnitzler. First performed in 1912, it tells the story of a Jewish doctor who prevents a Catholic priest from giving the last rites to a patient who is unaware that she is dying. Himself a qualified doctor, Schnitzler takes a wry look at the medical profession, and at the politics and ethics of medical care. In addressing the controversial issue of intercultural tolerance and asking what might constitute ‘a good death’, the play is as relevant and challenging today as it was a century ago.

This abridged adaptation of Professor Bernhardi, which also draws on Schnitzler’s archive and diaries, is a collaboration between Foreign Affairs and academics of the AHRC-funded Schnitzler Digital Edition Project.

2015-17

Original title:
Professor Bernhardi

Language:
German

: ensemble

Alessandra Armenise (2015)
Anja M Jacobsen (2016-17)
Camila França (2016-17)
Daniel Anderson (2016)
Franck Jeuffroy (2015)
Gavin Duff (2015-17)
Hugo Trebels (2016)
Ian Keir Attard (2017)
Nick Danan (2017)
Nigel Fyfe (2015)
Matt Kyle (2015)
Trine Garrett (2016-17)
Will Timbers (2015-17)

: production team

Director Trine Garrett

Movement Director Fiona Watson (2015)
Technical Design & Support Kamal Prashar (2015)

Technical support Krzysia Balińska (2015)

Producers Foreign Affairs
and Schnitzler Digital Edition Project (2015-16)

Supported by Arts & Humanities Research Council, UCL Grand Challenges, University College London, University of Cambridge, Cambridge University Library and University of Bristol.

thanks to
Andrew Webber, Judith Beniston and Annja Neumann

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